An Unexpected Lobbyist

By Wanda Lucas

Wanda Lucas is an unexpected lobbyist.

I remember my first Lobby Day with NBCC, meeting with a politician whose views were very different than my own.  Initially nervous, I found the exchange with him to be inviting and warm while offering a platform on which to use my voice. It worked well because we all listened to each other realizing we shared more commonalities than differences.  This meeting, in my mind, was powerful not only because we each had our own agendas, but we were all passionate about our personal experiences.  However, in that time and place, the strength of the advocate’s voices surprised me.

I didn’t expect the power of the advocate.

We, the NBCC advocates, were in this office that held such national power, and yet, we were the people educating, informing and displaying a rare form of scientific knowledge not normally found in grassroots advocates. We had been trained by NBCC to speak our points effectively, efficiently and articulately.

I believe this level of action is especially poignant for women since we fought for the right to vote. And when it comes to lobbying and being involved in advocacy, I view it the same way. It is not just my right; it is my responsibility. No one knows why we were “chosen” to receive a diagnosis of breast cancer.  Was it a wake up call? Was it part of our pre-determined path? Could it be classified as our purpose in life?  I am not sure. But one thing is certain—we made a choice to fight. And we have a way to make our voices heard. We can speak for those who may be too afraid or embarrassed by the word “cancer.” We can gather our courage and strike a mighty blow, collectively.

We want to affect policy makers and the best weapons we have are our voices. Although different and personal, our experiences have joined us, and they remain powerful in their significance. With these powerful voices, we CAN put an end to breast cancer. Actually, this is the only way we can succeed. Breast Cancer Deadline 2020® is real and so are we. Let’s clear our throats and use our voices to make real change happen.

Often described as “the basic source of support from the ground up,” grassroots advocacy has a place in my heart. It has become a part of my life and for that I am grateful, empowered and excited. So, who am I?  I am an unexpected lobbyist. Will you join me?

Posted in Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Deadline 2020, National Breast Cancer Coalition, NBCC Annual Advocate Summit, Project LEAD | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Making the End to Breast Cancer a National Priority

 

May 7, 2012—Since its inception, NBCC has pushed breast cancer onto the national political agenda. Learn from political insiders about who and what shapes our nation’s priorities, what determines the discussion on Capitol Hill and the power advocates have in today’s political climate to make the end of breast cancer a national priority.

MODERATOR:

Susan Dentzer
, is the Editor-in-Chief of Health Affairs, the nation’s leading journal of health policy, and is an on-air analyst on health issues with the PBS NewsHour. She previously led the NewsHour’s health unit, reporting extensively on-air about health care reform debates. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the Council on Foreign Relations, and chairs the Board of Directors of the Global Health Council. She is also on the board of Research America. Ms. Dentzer graduated from Dartmouth and is a trustee emerita of the college. She currently serves as a member of the Board of Overseers of Dartmouth Medical School and is an Overseer of the International Rescue Committee, a leading humanitarian organization. 

SPEAKERS: Mike Castle, JD, is a former two-term Governor, nine-term US Congressman, Lieutenant Governor, Deputy Attorney General and State Senator.  He is currently a partner in DLA Piper’s Government Affairs practice. During his nine terms as Delaware’s sole member in the House of Representatives, Governor Castle served on the House Education and Labor Committee where he was chair of the Subcommittee on Education Reform, and the House Financial Services Committee.  Governor Castle is known for working across party lines, building bridges and forming coalitions to find pragmatic bipartisan solutions to some of the most pressing problems facing the country.  His work with a coalition of moderate GOP senators, House members, governors, and other elected officials aimed to promote centrist and pragmatic Republican candidates and issues.  He received a BA from Hamilton College, and a JD from Georgetown University Law School.

Judy Feder, PhD
, is an Institute Fellow at the Urban Institute, a Professor of Public Policy at Georgetown University and, from 1999 to 2008, served as dean of the Georgetown Public Policy Institute. A nationally-recognized leader in health policy, Judy has made her mark on the nation’s health insurance system, through both scholarship and public service. A widely published scholar, Judy’s health policy research began at the Brookings Institution, continued at the Urban Institute, and, since 1984, flourished at Georgetown University. In the late 1980s, Judy moved from policy research to policy leadership, actively promoting effective health reform as staff director of the congressional Pepper Commission (chaired by Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV) in 1989-90; principal deputy assistant secretary for planning and evaluation at the Department of Health and Human Services in former President Bill Clinton’s first term; a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress (2008-2011) and in 2006 and 2008, was the Democratic nominee for Congress in Virginia’s 10th congressional district. She received a BA from Brandeis University, and a MA and PhD from Harvard University.

Mark Halperin
, Editor-at-Large and Senior Political Analyst for TIME, covers politics, elections and government for the magazine and TIME.com. Halperin is also the creator and author of TIME.com’s “The Page,” and is senior political analyst for MSNBC, where he appears regularly on “Morning Joe” and other programs on the cable channel. Prior to joining TIME in April 2007, Halperin worked at ABC News for nearly 20 years, where he covered five presidential elections and served as political director from November 1997 to April 2007. He also appeared regularly on ABC News TV and radio as a correspondent and analyst, contributing commentary and reporting during election night coverage, presidential inaugurations and State of the Union speeches. Additionally, Halperin founded and edited the online publication The Note, characterized as the most influential daily tipsheet in American politics by He is the co-author of the New York Times #1 best-seller Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, Palin and McCain, and the Race of a Lifetime (Harper, 2010); and a number of other political books. Halperin received his BA from Harvard University. 

Ruth Marcus, JD
, is a Columnist and Editorial Writer for The Washington Post, specializing in American politics and domestic policy.  Ms. Marcus has been with The Post since 1984. She joined the national staff in 1986, covering campaign finance, the Justice Department, the Supreme Court and the White House.  From 1999 through 2002 she served as Deputy National Editor, supervising reporters who covered money and politics, Congress, the Supreme Court, and other national issues. She joined the Editorial Board in 2003 and began writing a regular column in 2006. A graduate of Yale College and Harvard Law School, she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 2007.

Carol Matyka, MA
, is National Breast Cancer Coalition’s Massachusetts Volunteer Field Coordinator and leads that state’s grassroots advocacy efforts to further the NBCC legislative and policy agenda. Since her breast cancer diagnosis in 1994, Carol has been involved in many NBCC initiatives, including development of quality care guidelines and measurements, and she is a faculty member of NBCC’s Quality Care Project LEAD®. She has served as a reviewer for the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, California Breast Cancer Research Program and as a consumer advisor on several breast cancer research grant proposals. Carol is also founding member of CARE Advocates at Tufts Medical Center, a patient advocacy group that promotes consumer involvement in designing and developing programs for breast cancer patients and their families.

Like this? Watch other thought-provoking conversations at the Online Center for NBCC Advocacy Training.

Want to Do More? Donate Now and Support the End of Breast Cancer by January 1, 2020

You can help us accelerate our progress toward a world without breast cancer by making a tax-deductible contribution to NBCC right now.

Sign the Petition to the President

Whoever is elected President this November must commit to a leadership role in Breast Cancer Deadline 2020®.

Sign the Petition to the President today!

Posted in Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Deadline 2020, National Breast Cancer Coalition, NBCC Annual Advocate Summit | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off

Tweet to the End of Breast Cancer

By Teri Fuller, National Breast Cancer Coalition, END Breast Cancer Illinois

Teri Fuller

In 2009, the Special Olympics launched an online advocacy campaign asking people to stop using the word “retarded” in harmful, demeaning ways. This campaign, “Spread the Word to End the Word,” strategically and effectively used social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, and blogs to accomplish this mission. One particular online milestone that demonstrates the power of Twitter occurred when Special Olympics advocates tweeted their campaign at John Mayer, a popular musician. Mayer then retweeted the campaign to his 1.5 million followers, which in large part was responsible for the campaign going viral and helping them to reach more than 3.8 million people.

As NBCC advocates, we can learn from the Special Olympics’ strategy to harness the online power of Twitter in accomplishing Breast Canceer Deadline 2020®.

So what is Twitter? By design, Twitter is a social media tool that publishes textual sound-bytes. Similar to a traditional sound-byte that lasts only nine seconds, a tweet only consists of 140 characters. So in “snackable” bites, you can raise awareness of NBCC’s mission and get people to take action and help us end breast cancer by 2020.

But you already use Facebook, right? And that’s great, but keep in mind that Facebook and Twitter address two very different audiences: Facebook connects you with a personal network (friends, family, colleagues, etc.); Twitter connects you with an impersonal network (fellow advocates, organizations, experts in the field, journalists, etc.). The prevailing wisdom is that 80 percetnt of your Facebook followers are local, and 80 percent of your Twitter followers are national. So you can meet, interact, learn from, and teach a whole new set of people—some of which are very powerful online movers and shakers who can substantially help further our cause (a la the John Mayer phenomenon).

How to Set Up a Twitter Account

1. Go to www.twitter.com.
2. Sign up for Twitter by entering required information (i.e. Full Name, Email, and Password).
3. Note: When creating your account, choose a handle, or name for yourself, that reflects your identity. Some people choose to use variations of their name (i.e. @firstlastname); some people choose to use words reflective of their advocacy work (i.e. @breastcancerdeadline2020).
4. Start following people. There are lots of important people and/or organizations to follow. Here are just a few to get you started:

@deadline2020 (NBCC)
@bigshotfuller@mac.com (me)
@lizszabo (Health Writer for USA Today).

5. Personalize your profile by adding an image (photo and/or symbol) and a short bio about yourself (160 characters or less). This may be a great place to link to NBCC’s website and NBCC’s Petition to the President.

How Twitter Works

1. People’s names, or handles, are preceeded by an @ symbol, so my Twitter name is @bigshotfuller. If you follow me, you will see my tweets preceeded by this handle, and you can also make sure I read your tweets by tweeting at me. You do this by including @bigshotfuller in your tweet.

2. The # symbol, or hashtag, is used to mark key words or topics in a tweet. If you create a tweet about NBCC’s Deadline 2020, you could add the hashtag #breastcancer, and other people interested in that topic could find your tweet as well.

How to Compose a Tweet

1. Present your main point.
2. Capture the reader’s interest.
3. Include a hashtag such as #breastcancer or #deadline2020 to indicate the topic of your tweet.
4. Tweet directly at anyone who may be interested in reading and/or retweeting your message (i.e. @deadline2020).
5. Include a link that allows interested parties to learn more about your topic and/or take action.

How to Tweet Most Effectively

1. Present the main message of your tweet clearly, succinctly as 98 percent of followers won’t click on included link.
2. Tweet at different times throughout the day as the average tweet lifespan is 10 minutes.
3. Think, more specifically, about when your audience may read your tweets. The Twitter sweet spots tend to be between 6-8am, 12-2pm, and 8-11pm, but you should begin to gauge your own audience. Tweet during identified peak times.

Your First Twitter Homework

Now that you have created a Twitter account and know the basics, it’s time to compose your first Tweet. You may copy the example below or make one up for yourself.

Example:

40K people die of #breastcancer in the #US each year. Want to end it? Sign this petition now: http://bit.ly/RsP6wD @bigshotfuller Pls RT.

After that, you will begin building your national network. People will follow you, and you will follow them. You will learn from others, and they will learn from you as you raise awareness of NBCC’s critical mission to end breast cancer by 2020. And maybe—just maybe—we can make our mission go viral just like the Special Olympics’ campaign did in 2009.

Posted in Breast Cancer Deadline 2020 | Comments Off

Musa Mayer, MFA, MA on Overcoming Barriers to Change: Problems in the System

 

May 7, 2012—As an advocate, ever wonder how you can exert your own influence and perspective to achieve our mission to end breast cancer by January 1, 2020? These conversations by influential speakers provide fascinating insights into the political and public policy world that impact breast cancer in significant ways.

Bio: Musa Mayer, MFA, MS is a 22 year breast cancer survivor, advocate, Project LEAD® graduate and instructor, and author of many books and articles on the breast cancer experience, breast cancer medicine, science and advocacy. Serving on FDA advisory committees, developing an online course in evidence-based healthcare for advocates, and working with researchers studying brain metastasis have been some of her long-term commitments. Through her website AdvancedBC.org and the BCMETS.org online community, Musa focuses daily on helping women with metastatic breast cancer and their families understand treatment options and emerging research.

Like this? Watch other thought-provoking conversations at the Online Center for NBCC Advocacy Training.

Want to Do More? Donate Now and Support the End of Breast Cancer by January 1, 2020

You can help us accelerate our progress toward a world without breast cancer by making a tax-deductible contribution to NBCC right now.

Sign the Petition to the President

Whoever is elected President this November must commit to a leadership role in Breast Cancer Deadline 2020®.

Sign the Petition to the President today!

Posted in Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Deadline 2020, Center for NBCC Advocacy Training, National Breast Cancer Coalition, NBCC Annual Advocate Summit | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off

My Two Cents Worth

This summer, one of our newest advocates, Sherri Stahl, attended NBCC’s six-day advocacy training program, Project LEAD®. Following her training, she sent this email to her network of friends and colleagues. The email is printed in its entirety with her permission. 

Sherri Stahl, para-gliding in Southern California.

Hi All:

A few weeks ago I participated in an intense 6-day program called Project LEAD given by the National Breast Cancer Coalition (NBCC).  Project LEAD is a science training program for breast cancer advocates and I learned about basic science, breast cancer, immunology, epidemiology, research, and many other subjects related to evidence based health care.  Yes, you read that correctly, the girl who hasn’t taken a science class since middle school took this program!  At Project LEAD I also learned about NBCC, which is a wonderful organization and the purpose of this e-mail.  The e-mail is a little long so I’ve included surprises for you to encourage you to read the entire e-mail.  Don’t skip ahead (ok, I know some of you (and you know who you are too) will skip so if you have to skip ahead please be sure to sign the Petition found at the link under #2 below)!

First, a little information about NBCC.  It is a network of hundreds of breast cancer related organizations along with tens of thousands of individuals all over the world.  NBCC is committed to helping scientists obtain the funding they need for meaningful breast cancer research, ensuring that everyone has access to quality, evidence-based health care, and also ensuring that trained, educated advocates have a voice everywhere breast cancer decisions are made.  As a result of NBCC’s advocacy, the Department of Defense (yes that is correct, DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) was created and funded in 1992 to eradicate breast cancer by funding innovative, high impact research through a partnership of scientists and advocates.

Now for the first surprise that was an “Ah Ha!” moment for me – One of the first grants given by the BCRP in 1993 was to Dennis Slamon to support his preliminary studies which ultimately resulted in the cancer fighting drug known as Herceptin which targets HER2 positive breast cancer.  In 2008 I was diagnosed with HER2 positive breast cancer and treated with chemo and Herceptin.  In 2012 I am still here, alive and well and participating in Project LEAD given by NBCC.  So, now that I’ve had my Project LEAD training, I will put this in equation format:

NBCC = DOD BRCP = Dennis Slamon = Herceptin = me = NBCC! 

How cool is that!  So you can see why NBCC is near and dear to me and my family and why I am asking you to do a few things:

1.  Check out NBCC’s website at www.BreastCancerDeadline2020.org to learn more about this wonderful organization.

2.  When you check out the website you will see that NBCC’s mission is to end breast cancer by designing and acting on effective strategies that involve and call upon the President, Congress, research institutions and health care providers to end breast cancer.  In 2010 NBCC started a new campaign: Breast Cancer Deadline 2020®, which is a call to action for researchers, policy makers, breast cancer advocates and others to end breast cancer by January 1, 2020.  This campaign focuses on (a) the cause and prevention of breast cancer metastasis in order to save lives; and (b) primary prevention of breast cancer to stop the disease from developing in the first instance.  To assist in this campaign, NBCC would like as many people as possible to sign a petition addressed to the President asking for a public commitment to work with NBCC to end breast cancer by 2020.  They want to deliver as many signatures as possible to the President after the election.  So please consider signing the petition which can be found at: 

http://www.breastcancerdeadline2020.org/act/Presidential-Petition.html.

I’ve also attached it to this email.  Also, please consider sending this information and the petition to your friends and relatives.

3.  In addition, NBCC is looking for organizations to support its Breast Cancer Deadline 2020® campaign, not just those focused on breast cancer, but all who care about and understand the importance of this issue.  So I am attaching the Organization Endorsement form which can be found at:

http://www.breastcancerdeadline2020.org/act/organizational-endorsement/organizational-endorsement.html

There is no financial commitment–just a commitment that the organization become educated about the issues and solutions to end breast cancer by 2020 and communicate to others about it.  If you belong to any organizations, please consider having your organization endorse Breast Cancer Deadline 2020® and again, please pass this on to your friends and relatives.

 4.  Finally, when you are making your annual charitable contributions, please consider adding NBCC to your list and making annual donations to NBCC.

 Surprise #2 – check out the picture of me para-gliding during a break at Project LEAD!

If you have any questions or want more information just give me a call.  Thanks for taking the time to read this e-mail and supporting NBCC and its mission to end breast cancer by 2020!  Love, Sherri

Want to Do More? Donate Now and Support the End of Breast Cancer by January 1, 2020

You can help us accelerate our progress toward a world without breast cancer by making a tax-deductible contribution to NBCC right now.

Sign the Petition to the President

Whoever is elected President this November must commit to a leadership role in Breast Cancer Deadline 2020®.

Sign the Petition to the President today!

Posted in Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Deadline 2020, DOD BCRP, National Breast Cancer Coalition, Project LEAD | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Breast Cancer Deadline 2020® Makes a Difference Globally

By Bolivia Bocaranda, President Senosayuda, Venezuela

(Translated to English below)

Bolivia Bocaranda, President of Senosayuda in Venezuela, graduated from NBCC's International Project LEAD®. From left to right bottom row: Sara McKenna, UK; Adrianna Kaufman, Argentina; Karima Elshamy, Egypt; Christine Brunswick, US. Second Row left to right: Bolivia Bocaranda, Venezuela; Michelle Marven, Australia; Diane Moore, Canada; Colleen Marco, South Africa.

NBCC cambio mi visión como sobreviviente …..Fue hace 10 años la primera vez q participe en la conferencia anual. Allí entendí lo q era ser una activista del cáncer …….concepto difícil  de entender  para mujeres como yo que viven en países tercermundistas como lo es Venezuela

NBCC me dio las herramientas a través de Proyect Lead para empoderarme en mi trabajo como sobreviviente, voluntaria y fundadora de Senosayuda. Este aprendizaje siempre ha sido compartido con nuestros miembros y expresión de eso es el cambio que hicimos en nuestra misión incorporando el trabajo en red y advocacy.

NBCC con la iniciativa del Deadline 2020, nos permite formar parte de ese grassroots networking a nivel global y sentirnos parte de su misión de erradicar cáncer de mama

En NBCC con su liderazgo y experticia nos dieron la motivación necesaria para que nosotras pudiésemos crecer y dejar de ser un grupo de apoyo, patrocinado por una industria farmacéutica  para convertirnos en la organización líder en Venezuela, ya con 37 activistas entrenadas, con presencia en 13 estados y con un documento de consenso presentado y avalado por más de 150 organizaciones relacionadas con el tema y entregado en el congreso nacional, y en el ministerio de la salud.

NBCC gracias por ser parte de ustedes

English Translation

NBCC changed my vision  as a survivor. It has been 10 years since the first time I participated in an annual conference. There I came to understand what it is to be a cancer activist. The concept is difficult to understand for women like me who live in a third-world country like Venezuela. NBCC has given me the tools through Project LEAD® and has empowered me in my work as a survivor, volunteer and founder of Senosayuda. The learning always helps with our members and we have been able to translate  this new understanding by incorporating the work of networking  and advocacy into our own mission.

NBCC with its initiative of Breast Cancer Deadline 2020®, allows us to be part of this global grassroots network and to feel part of the mission to end breast cancer.

With NBCC’s leadership and experience we have been given the necessary motivation to stop being a support group sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry, and instead grow to become the leading organization in Venezuela. With 37 trained activists, we have a presence in 13 states and have presented a consensus document endorsed by more than 150 organizations involved in the issue, which has been delivered in Congress and to the ministry of health.

NBCC, thank you for allowing us to be part of your coalition.

Want to Do More? Donate Now and Support the End of Breast Cancer by January 1, 2020

You can help us accelerate our progress toward a world without breast cancer by making a tax-deductible contribution to NBCC right now.

Sign the Petition to the President

Whoever is elected President this November must commit to a leadership role in Breast Cancer Deadline 2020®.

Sign the Petition to the President today!

Posted in Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Deadline 2020, Center for NBCC Advocacy Training, National Breast Cancer Coalition, NBCC Annual Advocate Summit, Project LEAD | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Sue Love, So What’s New in Breast Cancer

May 22, 2010—Dr. Susan Love explains the importance of the microenvironment of a tumor – the “neighborhood” and its interactions both within and outside of that neighborhood that result in cancer and metastasis. She offers insights into preventing and ending breast cancer in this engaging presentation.

Bio: Susan M. Love, MD, MBA, FACS has dedicated her professional life to the eradication of breast cancer. As President of the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation, she oversees a $4 million research program on breast cancer cause and prevention. She is a Clinical Professor of Surgery at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine and is well known to women worldwide through her books and the Foundation website. The fifth edition of Dr. Susan Love’s Breast Book was released October 2010. Her most recent project, the Love/Avon Army of Women, partners women and scientists to accelerate basic translational research. She received her MD from SUNY Downstate Medical Center in NY and did her surgical training at Boston’s Beth Israel Hospital. She founded Boston’s Faulkner Breast Center and the Revlon UCLA Breast Center in LA. She has an MBA from UCLA’s Anderson School.

Like this? Watch other thought-provoking conversations at the Online Center for NBCC Advocacy Training.

Want to Do More? Donate Now and Support the End of Breast Cancer by January 1, 2020

You can help us accelerate our progress toward a world without breast cancer by making a tax-deductible contribution to NBCC right now.

Sign the Petition to the President

Whoever is elected President this November must commit to a leadership role in Breast Cancer Deadline 2020®.

Sign the Petition to the President today!

Posted in Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Deadline 2020, National Breast Cancer Coalition, NBCC Annual Advocate Summit | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Why Researchers Need Breast Cancer Advocates

By Brunhilde Felding-Habermann, PhD, Associate Professor, The Scripps Research Institute and Project LEAD® Faculty

Brunhilde Felding-Habermann works with an NBCC advocate at The Scripps Research Institute during a Project LEAD® field trip.

As with any other research, research on breast cancer can have very diverse overall goals, specific aims and study designs.  As generally in research, the selection of new research directions is naturally driven by our immediate findings and the discovery of how biological pathways are involved in processes that we study. In basic research, a noble goal is to identify new meaningful questions built on each answer we found. This strategy can lead to an accumulation of a large body of knowledge that enhances our overall understanding of biological mechanisms. This understanding might eventually help to innovate therapies against diseases that could involve the biological processes studied.

When I first set out to establish my own lab in academic research, my goal was to enhance our understanding of mechanisms that drive breast cancer metastasis. The very first research grant that I received was from the California Breast Cancer Research Program. This program made a huge difference for me, not only by allowing me to embark on my own research but also by connecting me with breast cancer advocacy.  This connection turned out to be of fundamental importance for me, everyone in my group, and the design of our research projects. The interaction with breast cancer advocates taught me and continues to teach me, essentially every day, why we do the work we do and for whom we search for new insight into what determines the onset and progression of breast cancer.  I learned that we cannot work purely for information seeking purposes only. I learned that we must develop our research strategies so that our projects have an immediate potential to break new ground toward significant improvement of breast cancer therapy. I became keenly aware that the mission of our work is to make a tangible difference for breast cancer patients now, and not in the far away future. And that we must strive to generate information and tools that will help women to avoid becoming breast cancer patients in the first place.

Another very important aspect of working with breast cancer advocates is hard to frame in words. Every time I meet with a breast cancer advocate or a group, I receive an indescribable boost of energy. Every one I met who decided to be an advocate, has enriched me and everyone in my group to reach high and work hard for them, their children, and everyone with or carrying a risk of breast cancer. The determination of advocates, and the reality message that hoping for better treatments is not an alternative because we live now, is empowering and transmits a clear message of responsibility that propels our work.

Working with students of Project LEAD® this year was fantastic. I wish to thank everyone in the group for their determination, power, and kindness. The sense that we are in this together, and that we can work together to end breast cancer is strong. Neither one of us can reach this goal alone. So, thank you for being there and for working with us.

Want to Do More? Donate Now and Support the End of Breast Cancer by January 1, 2020

You can help us accelerate our progress toward a world without breast cancer by making a tax-deductible contribution to NBCC right now.

Sign the Petition to the President

Whoever is elected President this November must commit to a leadership role in Breast Cancer Deadline 2020®.

Sign the Petition to the President today!

Posted in Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Deadline 2020, National Breast Cancer Coalition, Project LEAD | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off

Paul Davies, PhD is Changing the Conversation and the Outcomes: Models of Innovation

 

May 1, 2011—Davies’ work includes puzzling over deep theories like the origin, distribution, evolution and destiny of life, or black hole theories and quantum physics, and applies these principles to the quest for radical new breakthroughs in cancer.

Bio: Paul Davies, PhD, is a theoretical physicist, cosmologist, astrobiologist and author. He is Director of the Beyond Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science and co-Director of the Cosmology Initiative, both at Arizona State University. In addition, he is principal investigator at the Arizona State University Physical Sciences-Oncology Center whose foremost aim is to rigorously question the central tenets of cancer biology and to innovate paradigm shifting tactics that challenge the barriers of contemporary cancer research and treatments. In addition to his research, Davies is a passionate science communicator, and speaks world-wide to academic, public and media audiences. His 28 popular books have been translated into over 20 languages, and are notable for presenting complex ideas in accessible terms.

Like this? Watch other thought-provoking conversations at the Online Center for NBCC Advocacy Training.

 

Want to Do More? Donate Now and Support the End of Breast Cancer by January 1, 2020

You can help us accelerate our progress toward a world without breast cancer by making a tax-deductible contribution to NBCC right now.

Sign the Petition to the President

Whoever is elected President this November must commit to a leadership role in Breast Cancer Deadline 2020®.

Sign the Petition to the President today!

Posted in Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Deadline 2020, Center for NBCC Advocacy Training, National Breast Cancer Coalition, NBCC Annual Advocate Summit | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off